Ford Technical Features

Carpet Installation Know-How

As we all know, the interior carpet is subject to some of the most brutal and constant abuse your car will ever see. How many times have you launched a full soda or cup of coffee into your floorboard only to let it sit there as you watch the carpet soak it up? If you’re lucky, you have a dark colored interior that will help mask the ever-popular blunder and minimize the spill area (except for the stench and stickiness, that is)

Read more

Tire Cleaning: 101

This may seem like a super simple little project, but believe me, when your tires have been coated in primer overspray, it’s not.

Our project Chevelle was in the shop undergoing bodywork, primer, more bodywork, more primer, some finessing bodywork, a little more primer…well, you get the idea. The car was moved around in the shop (a lot) over the course of the months, and quite often, our wheels and tires were the unlikely recipient of some nasty overspray, rubbing compound, etc.

Read more

Manufacturing Reproduction Auto Parts

GM made a lot of die cast parts for our classic Chevys. Often referred to as pot metal, the parts were actually die cast zinc. Making the millions of 1955, ’56 and ’57 Chevrolets that GM did required multiple vendors, multiple factories, and multiple assembly plants.

Manufacturing reproduction auto parts starts with the best original part that’s available for a sample/pattern. Since there were no computers, and therefore no computer assisted design (CAD) in the ’50s, and multiple vendors for many parts, it is a challenge to find that perfect pattern part!

Read more

Oil Pump and Pan Installation

Tools: standard socket set, standard wrenches, long screwdriver or pry bar, gasket scraper

Cost: approximately $50 for pump, $50-$250 for pan

Tinware: pan and pump, oil pan gasket, gasket sealer

Tip: When working with an engine on a stand, make sure it’s on a flat level surface and the rotation lock pin is in place.

Performance gains: Swapping on a high-volume oil pump and an aftermarket pan can produce up to a 10-15 hp gain on some engines.

Read more

Transmission Removal and Replacement

Time: 4-5 hours

Tools: standard socket set, standard wrenches, floor jack and jackstands, torque converter holding tool (optional), transmission jack (optional)

Cost: varies depending on tools required or transmission selected

Tinware: transmission fluid, transmission tailshaft plug, new transmission mount (recommended)

Tip: After removing the driveshaft from the rear of the transmission housing, install a stop plug over the tailshaft to avoid fluid from spilling out.

Performance gains: Transmission trouble is never fun. Whether it’s for repair, rebuilding, or all-out racing, a finely-tuned transmission is a cornerstone of performance.

Read more

Dual-Feed Carb Conversion


Time: 1 hour (approximately)

Tools: socket set, flat-blade screwdriver, small putty knife or scraper, adjustable wrenches (optional).

Cost: (varied) approximately $100-$300

Tinware: center-hung float fuel bowls (if needed), metering block and hardware (sold as kit), metering jets, replacement gaskets, dual-inlet fuel line.

Tip: transfer the carburetor from the engine to a clean, open workbench. If you don’t have a carb stand, simply slide four bolts of your choice through the mounting holes in the bottom plate, and “nut” them up at the top. All you need is enough clearance for the levers and protruding linkage. (see photo #1)

Performance gains: increased fuel delivery and tuning accuracy.

Read more

A/C: Converting To 134A

Until 1995, most cars with air conditioning used R-12 Freon refrigerant that is said to have a negative side effect of damaging the ozone layer and is no longer produced in most countries. Now, the industry standard is R-134a, which is an efficient absorber and carrier of heat without the ozone layer-damaging issues of R-12. Contrary to popular belief, most cars originally equipped with R-12 can be converted to 134a and still keep you just as cool.

Read more

Carburetor: Dual-Feed Conversion

Time: 1 hour (approximately)

Tools: socket set, flat-blade screwdriver, small putty knife or scraper, adjustable wrenches (optional).

Cost: (varied) approximately $100-$300

Tinware: center-hung float fuel bowls (if needed), metering block and hardware (sold as kit), metering jets, replacement gaskets, dual-inlet fuel line.

Tip: transfer the carburetor from the engine to a clean, open workbench. If you don’t have a carb stand, simply slide four bolts of your choice through the mounting holes in the bottom plate, and “nut” them up at the top. All you need is enough clearance for the levers and protruding linkage. (see photo #1)

Performance gains: increased fuel delivery and tuning accuracy.

Read more