General

Why Don't They Make That Part?

One of the most common questions in classic Chevy car circles is: “Why don’t they make this part for my car?” As a supplier and manufacturer to the aftermarket for many years, we will attempt to answer this question and shed some light on manufacturing parts for the aftermarket and classic car market.

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Tire Cleaning: 101

This may seem like a super simple little project, but believe me, when your tires have been coated in primer overspray, it’s not.

Our project Chevelle was in the shop undergoing bodywork, primer, more bodywork, more primer, some finessing bodywork, a little more primer…well, you get the idea. The car was moved around in the shop (a lot) over the course of the months, and quite often, our wheels and tires were the unlikely recipient of some nasty overspray, rubbing compound, etc.

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NCM Motorsports Park Hosting Youth Driving School

Car enthusiasts are steeped in all manner of specs, facts and data– but does it make us better drivers? While most of us would like to think we’re handier behind the wheel than most, a quick look at thisthis, and this reminds us that knowledge or passion does not beget skill.

That’s where the Tire Rack Street Survival day at the National Corvette Museum Motorsports Park comes in.

While reserved for youth aged 15-21 with a valid drivers license, the all-day, hands-on course looks to teach teens about proper vehicle control and the techniques needed to drive in the real world.

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A/C: Converting To 134A

Until 1995, most cars with air conditioning used R-12 Freon refrigerant that is said to have a negative side effect of damaging the ozone layer and is no longer produced in most countries. Now, the industry standard is R-134a, which is an efficient absorber and carrier of heat without the ozone layer-damaging issues of R-12. Contrary to popular belief, most cars originally equipped with R-12 can be converted to 134a and still keep you just as cool.

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Carburetor: Dual-Feed Conversion

Time: 1 hour (approximately)

Tools: socket set, flat-blade screwdriver, small putty knife or scraper, adjustable wrenches (optional).

Cost: (varied) approximately $100-$300

Tinware: center-hung float fuel bowls (if needed), metering block and hardware (sold as kit), metering jets, replacement gaskets, dual-inlet fuel line.

Tip: transfer the carburetor from the engine to a clean, open workbench. If you don’t have a carb stand, simply slide four bolts of your choice through the mounting holes in the bottom plate, and “nut” them up at the top. All you need is enough clearance for the levers and protruding linkage. (see photo #1)

Performance gains: increased fuel delivery and tuning accuracy.

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Car Wash Tips

After washing your car, let the water flow heavily over the car. The water will sheet off and it will be much easier to dry as well as help avoid water spots.

Recommended: Heavy flowing water will help the excess water dissipate faster, making it easier for drying.

Not recommended: A light final rinse will leave plenty of water droplets to wipe down. If they’re not wiped off fast enough, water spots can result.

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Wet Sanding

Bodywork: Wet Sanding

Time: depends on size of area and repetition

Tools: soft-block sanding pad

Cost: approximately $40-50 for supplies

Tinware: 1000-4000-grit fine sandpaper, garden hose or bucket, clean rags, rubbing compound, high quality Carnauba wax

Tip: Choose an open, outdoor area that will allow you to run water

continuously for extended periods of time.

Performance gains: Properly wet-sanding your vehicle will make a night-and

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