C2 1963-67

1955-1964 Corvette Exhaust Manifold ID

All early Chevrolet Corvette factory exhaust manifolds are cast iron. Since the manifolds are cast, the actual casting number and date are raised above the actual surface of the part. Most casting numbers are visible when the manifold is installed on the engine. The casting number location and casting date location will vary from year to year and sometimes manifold to manifold. Some manifolds will not carry a casting date at all. Small block manifolds do not carry a year designation. 2" outlet small block manifolds will have a casting date, while most 2 1/2" outlet manifolds do not have a casting date. There were two types of manifolds being cast for Corvette, the first from the Flint, Michigan built engines, which were cast in Saginaw, Michigan. All small block Corvettes used these manifolds. The second type was cast at the Tonawanda Engine plant and all Corvette big block engines used these manifolds. The big block manifolds will be discussed and identified in the second installment of this article.

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Classic 1955-65 Corvette Camshaft ID

The camshaft is the one part of the internal combustion engine, which has the most bearing on how that engine will operate. The basic function of the camshaft is to control the timing, the length, the speed, and the height of the intake and exhaust valve openings inside the cylinder head. The camshaft in all Chevrolet engines is located within its own bearing chamber below the cylinder head face and above the oil pan rails. There have been some minor changes in rear camshaft bearing face design, but for the most part the camshaft has remained the same from 1955-82. It is important to verify which type of block, rear bearing face and camshaft bearing you need before you invest in a camshaft.

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1966 Sting Ray 427

The 1966 Sting Ray’s styling was very similar to the ’65’s, but there were some subtle changes. The Corvette “script” emblem was an elongated, more vertical style and was affixed to the hood and rear deck. The grille was now a plated, square mesh, cast unit. The roof B-pillar vents that had been both functional and non-functional in previous mid-year Corvettes (1964-1965) were now deleted. Another cool thing about the ’66? This was the intro year for the legendary 427!

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1965 Sting Ray: The First Big-Block Corvette


The 1965 Sting Ray marked the third year of “C2” production. All models were manufactured at GM’s St. Louis Assembly. 1965 was the first year a big-block engine would find its way between the fenderwells of a Corvette, in the form of a Mark IV 396 generating 425 horsepower. Styling changes included removing the hood depressions that were common to the 1963 and ’64 models. The horizontal grille bars were now black with the outer grille trim remaining bright – this made the ’65’s grille one of a kind. Also, the front fender “gills” now sported three functional, vertical slots.

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Corvette Museum Wants Your Corvette

It’s always a pleasure to show off your pride and joy at a local car meet, or classic car showing. But if there’s anything better than having the general public admire your ride, it’s having the public admire it in a time-period correct display. If that piques your interest, you’re in luck. The National Corvette Museum is looking for Corvettes to fill in its various displays, and they want your help.

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Corvette Trivia

Corvette Triva. The C1-C3 Corvettes were very popular in the muscle car era, and still are to this day. They’re considered by many to be the most beautiful 2-seater sports car ever produced by General Motors.

The Corvette was conceived in 1951 by GM designer Harley Earl and his special projects crew to compete with the European sports cars, in hopes that this new GM sports car would win at the track.

In 1953, the Corvette debuted at the Motorama in New York City. Chevrolet quickly set up a temporary plant in Flint Michigan, where 300 Corvettes were all hand built.

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